Political Epistemology

Political Epistemology
Date
10 May 2018, 9.30am - 11 May 2018, 6.00pm
Type
Conference / Symposium
Venue
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Description

Keynote Speakers      

Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij

Reader in Philosophy

Birkbeck College, University of London

Elizabeth Anderson

Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies

University of Michigan  

Robert Talisse

W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy

Vanderbilt University

Additional Talks

Propaganda, Misinformation and the Epistemic Value of Democracy

Étienne Brown 

Postdoctoral Researcher at the Centre de recherche en éthique in Montreal. 

(Commentator: Emily Sullivan)

Self-Fulfilling Epistemic Injustice

Boudewijn de Bruin

Professor of Financial Ethics at the University of Groningen

(Commentator: Han van Wietmarschen)

The Epistemic Pathologies of Elections and the Lottocratic Alternative

Alexander Guerrero

Henry Rutgers Term Chair and Associate Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University

(Commentator: Jeroen de Ridder)

Deweyan Democratic Deliberation 

Catherine Elgin 

Professor of the Philosophy of Education at Harvard University


(Commentator: Jonathan J. Ichikawa)

Epistemic Constraints on Political Justification

Fabienne Peter

Professor of Philosophy and Head of Department at the University of Warwick

(Commentator: Elizabeth Edenberg)

The term "political epistemology" is fairly new, but we think it captures an important intersection between political philosophy and epistemology that has become especially important in the current political climate, where broad challenges to the notion of truth threaten the social fabric of our democracy.

This conference will bring together scholars working at the intersection of political philosophy and epistemology. The conference theme, Political Epistemology, is deliberately broad because there many ways in which epistemologists can learn from political philosophers and vice versa. For example, political philosophers have long been interested in reasonable disagreements, or what Rawls called “the fact of reasonable pluralism,” while disagreement has only recently become widely discussed in epistemology. There are also many unexplored ways in which theorizing about politics might benefit from the conceptual tools of epistemology; for instance, contemporary epistemology has focused on the social dimensions of knowledge, the epistemology of testimony, the norms governing assertion, and group belief. 


Schedule

May 10th

09:20-9:30 Introduction

Michael Hannon and Robin McKenna

9:30 -11:00 The Real Problem with Polarization

Robert Talisse (Keynote)

11:20-12:50 Deweyan Democratic Deliberation

Catherine Elgin

Commentator: Jonathan J. Ichikawa

14:30-16:00 The Epistemic Pathologies of Elections and the Lottocratic Alternative

Alexander Guerrero

Commentator: Jeroen de Ridder

16:20-17:50 Epistemic Bubbles and Authoritarian Politics

Elizabeth Anderson (Keynote)

19:00 Dinner (speakers and commentators)

 

May 11th

09:30-11:00 Propaganda, Misinformation and the Epistemic Value of Democracy

Étienne Brown

Commentator: Emily Sullivan

11:20-12:50 Self-Fulfilling Epistemic Injustice

Boudewijn de Bruin

Commentator: Han van Wietmarschen

14:30-16:00 Epistemic Constraints on Political Justification

Fabienne Peter

Commentator: Elizabeth Edenberg

16:20-17:50 The Case for Modeled Democracy

Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (Keynote)

This event is supported by generous contributions from the Institute of Philosophy, the Mind Association, and the Aristotelian Society. 

 

 

Contact

Institute of Philsophy
IP@sas.ac.uk
020 7664 4865